THE COLOSSEUM

This is a must see, at least if you are into ancient sites and ancient history! It is an amphitheater very well preserved, and worths to climb till the top to enjoy the views. They have reconstruct the part that didn’t make it, in a way that people can be seatted, and there are concerts been held there during summer. I visited on November, so although there were lots of visitors, it was not veery crowdy, and I enjoyed walkind in all parts of the colluseum, climb to the top, go underground, and had a break on the “modern” seats!

Except the ancient history, there is also the folklore element, with a legent about a local berber princess and her people hiding here from the arab intruders, and making an impressive escape through a tunnel connecting the amphitheater with the sea shore, lots of kilometres away. Such a tunnel hasn’t been found of course…

El Jem colluseum is the 3rd larger on the world after Rome’s and Verona’s and even better preserved than Rome’s.

 The Colosseum, is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

Occupying a site just east of the Roman Forum, its construction started in 72 AD under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in 80 AD under Titus, with further modifications being made during Domitian’s reign (81–96). The name “Amphitheatrum Flavium” derives from both Vespasian’s and Titus’s family name (Flavius, from the gens Flavia).

Capable of seating 50,000 spectators, the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine.

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~ by ferry1984 on August 6, 2011.

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