CRATER LAKE NATIONAL PARK

Crater Lake is a caldera lake located in the south-central region of the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the main feature of Crater Lake National Park and famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148 foot (655 m) deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama.

Crater Lake was formed around 4680 BC when the volcanic Mount Mazama blew its top in spectacular fashion. The eruption, estimated to have been 42 times more powerful than Mt. St. Helens’ 1980 blast, reduced Mazama’s approximate 11,000 foot height by around half a mile.

The mountain peak feel into the volcano’s partially emptied neck and magma chamber, and Crater Lake was formed in the new crater.

Crater Lake has long been revered as sacred by the Klamath tribe of Native Americans, whose myths embody the catastrophic event they witnessed thousands of years ago. The central legend tells of two Chiefs, Llao of the Underworld and Skell of the World Above, pitted in a battle which ended in the destruction of Llao’s home, Mt. Mazama.

                                                   

Crater Lake National Park attracts approximately 500,000 visitors per year, with the high season being July and August. Crater Lake National Park is located in southern Oregon on the crest of the Cascade Range, 100 miles from the Pacific coast. The National Park was established in 1902 and encompases 183,244 square miles. The 33-mile Rim Drive around Crater Lake is a two lane road that has more than 20 scenic overlooks. From mid-October until mid-June, the north entrance and Rim Drive are closed to the public due to deep snow and ice buildups along the road. Rim Drive around the east side of the lake can be closed earlier than mid-October and may not open until July. Deer and other wildlife crossing the road and icy conditions at any time of the year provide hazards to drivers.

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~ by ferry1984 on September 8, 2011.

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